Learning to Become a Bored Investor

I’ll admit that I’m about to bare my investing soul about one of my last great remaining weaknesses as an investor:  impatience.  May you benefit from what I’m about to share.  I write this in the shadow of selling my position in Google (GOOGL, GOOG) a few weeks ago after 1 1/2 years of very little activity which, as I’ve mentioned in other posts, hardly qualifies as the minimum 3 to 5 years that a person should hold a stock for.  What happened?  It spiked over 25% within a week of me selling it.

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How to Fail as an Investor

Don’t let the title of this post throw you off, because I’m going to engage you in a bit of reverse psychology.  Sometimes, a great way to do something right is to instead learn how it’s done wrong and then do the opposite.

A few years back, a friend of mine who knew that I was into stock investing asked me if he should get into it as well.  My first suggestion was that he absolutely not, foolishly assuming that my failure as an investor to that point automatically meant that somehow everybody else was destined to fail.  But sensing that nothing I would say would dissuade him, I half-jokingly replied, “If you do everything opposite to what I’ve done, you’ll probably do just fine!”

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Some Crucial Lessons About Buy-and-Hold Investing

One mantra that everybody even remotely acquainted with investing has heard for many years now is “buy and hold”.  I first learned about it over 20 years ago, but I was too impatient to put into practice plus I didn’t have the right information.  Finally, after ‘seeing the light’ upon learning the right information, here are some things I’ve learned since putting it into practice.

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